Queensbury and Stage Coaches

Leeds and Halifax Turnpike Road.

EMPLOYMENT OF THE POOR.

 The sum of £2000 is wanted on the security of the Tolls of the above roads, which produce an annual Revenue of £7575. Interest after the rate of 5 per cent. per annum will be punctually paid, half-yearly. The object of the Trustees in taking up the above sum is to give work to the unemployed poor of the neighbourhood.

Particulars may be known on application at the offices of Messrs. Hailston and Thompson in Bradford.

The money will be accepted in sums of not less than £100 each.

Bradford, July 24th, 1826.

 At a Meeting of the Highway Commissioners of the above board held at the Sun Inn, Bradford, May 23rd, 1824, Mr. Michael Stocks in the chair, “It was resolved to make a new road to Halifax and Manchester, so as to be able to avoid Clayton Heights, Blackstone Edge, and other considerable Hills.”

The present Manchester Road through Bankfoot, Odsal, Shelf, was made in place of the above named route,

Tolls and Turnpikes.

The etymology of Turnpike is as follows : “In early times it was the custom to fasten a pike, or spear head, loosely to the top of a post in order to prevent the intrusion of travellers not duly authorised to pass. This, turning round, of course presenting a point on every side, gave rise to the name “Turnpike,”

They were erected as early as the year A.D. 1267, and a penny was charged for each waggon passing through a manor.

 Stage Coaches passing daily through Queenshead, in 1807

From Manchester to Bradford, Leeds and York. Starting from the Bridgewater Arms, High Street, Manchester.

 

THE YORK AND HULL ROYAL MAIL COACH, at 8 o’clock.

Towns.

Distance. £  s.  d.
Rochdale. from Manchester. 12 miles 0  6     0
Halifax 28 miles 0 14    6
Bradford

rr

38 miles 0 18    6
Leeds

51

46 miles 1   3  6
Tadcaster 60 miles  .. 1 11    6
York 69 miles 1  15 0

 

THE HALIFAX AND LEEDS COACH.

From the Royal Oak Inn Market-st.-Lane, Manchester.

Every morning, Sunday excepted. Performed by C. Scudamore.

From the Swan Hotel, Manchester.

THE LEEDS, YORK AND HULL COACH, every morning at 6 o’clock,

 

From the Golden Lion, Deansgate, Manchester.

THE TRAFALGAR COACH, through Halifax, Leeds, York, etc. to Hull every morning at six o’clock, and arrives every day at one o’clock

Stage Coaches passing through Queensbury daily in 1822.

 The Defiance, to Manchester
The Royal Neptune, to Liverpool
The Alexander, to Leeds

Royal Mail Coaches passing daily through Queensbury in 1822

FROM YORK TO LIVERPOOL

The Royal Mail Coach left York at 12 at night, passing through Tadcaster, Leeds, Bradford, Halifax, Rochdale, Bolton, Manchester to Liverpool—distance 107 miles, and accomplished the journey in 15½ hours.

The Highflyer Mail Coach left York for Liverpool, via Manchester at six in the morning, and ran it in 15 hours.

Mail and Stage Coaches passing through Queensbury daily in 1830

 THE DUKE OF LEEDS, to Manchester and Liverpool

THE ROYAL MAIL, to Leeds

THE ROCKINGHAM, to Leeds

THE RAILWAY MAIL, to Liverpool

THE NEPTUNE, to Liverpool

THE ROYAL MAIL, to Manchester

THE DEFIANCE, to Manchester

THE HIGHFLYER, to Manchester

THE COMMERCE, to Manchester

THE ALEXANDER, to Bradford

ROYAL MAIL, from York to Liverpool

 

Stage Waggon Carriers in 1822

 Passing through Queensbury from York, Leeds, Bradford to Halifax,

Manchester and Liverpool.

 The stage waggons were used for the conveyance of merchandise, and as a rule they travelled extremely slow, they seldom changed horses, using the same cattle throughout the whole journey, the pace, indeed, was so proverbially slow in the North of England, that the publicans of Furness—in the Lake District in Lancashire—when they saw the conductors of these stage waggons appear in sight on the summit of  Wryrose Hill, on their way between Whitehaven and Kendal, began to brew their beer, always having a stock of good home-brewed drink ready by the time the travellers reached the village.

The transit of goods from this part of the country was chiefly by means of William and Edward Cockerham’s stage waggons from Halifax to Bradford, Leeds, York, Hull, and all parts of the east of Yorkshire; also to Harrogate, Ripon, Thirsk, Northallerton, Darlington, Durham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and all parts of the North of England, daily, from their warehouse, Low Green, Halifax, Mr. William Chapman being agent. Mr. Edward Cockerham above-named being grandfather to Mrs.Thos. Pryce, of Highfield Villas, Queensbury.

Improvements in Road Making

 In the year 1815 a great improvement took place in road-making by a gentleman named Mr. Macadam, who introduced the system at present in use known as making

MACADAMISED ROADS.

Through this system of road making the accelerations in the speed of the stage coaches and waggons were made as soon as any road was finished.

NE W PRINCIPLE.—From 1815 the average speed, including stop­pages, was 9 miles an hour, all but a furlong (220 yards) by the stagecoaches. The expenditure on turnpike roads in Yorkshire in 1818-19-20, was £70 per mile, and the average income from tolls per mile being £61. In the year 1829 Yorkshire had 1448 miles of turnpike roads.

Ford Carriers in 1830

 At Ford, Wharton, Carver & Co. were stage waggon carriers from Halifax to Bradford and Leeds, York, Selby, Hull and Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1830, and also kept stage coaches. Both stage waggons and coaches being kept at the Old Farm House at Ford.

 Height of Hills seen from Scarlett Heights, Mountain,

and Swilling Hill, Queensbury.

 

Compiled chiefly from the Ordnance Survey

Feet high.

  1. 1.
 Ingleboro’ Hill

2373

  1. 2.
Whernside

2414

  1. 3.
Penyghent,

2273

  1. 4.
Little Whernside

1984

  1. 5.
Pendle Hill …

1831

  1. 6.
Cracoe Fell    …

1650

  1. 7.
Beamsley Beacon

1341

  1. 8.
Rombald’s Moor…

1323

  1. 9.
Swill Hill – highest point

1320

 

 

 

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